Magazine article The New Yorker

1935-1945

Magazine article The New Yorker

1935-1945

Article excerpt

1935-1945

A Rea Irvin cover depicting the Normandy landings.

At the start of its second decade, The New Yorker remained devoted to the sophisticated pleasures of what Harold Ross called "metropolitan life." Depression at home, Fascism and Communism in Europe, and the spectre of war initially slipped into the magazine's pages without dimming them. In 1936, Janet Flanner wrote a three-part Profile of Hitler, which discussed the Fuhrer's race hatreds but put more emphasis on his vegetarianism and his celibacy. If The New Yorker had stuck to its founding voice throughout the cataclysms of the thirties and forties, it might have faded into irrelevance.

The Second World War changed the magazine for the better, and for good. Half the staff went into the military--Ross had to beg the War Department for draft deferments--and New Yorker writers in and out of uniform were pressed into service as war correspondents. …

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