Magazine article Teaching Business & Economics

Business Studies: A Core Curriculum, 2nd Edition

Magazine article Teaching Business & Economics

Business Studies: A Core Curriculum, 2nd Edition

Article excerpt

Business Studies: A Core Curriculum, 2nd edition, Ian Dorton and Alex Smith, Hodder and Stoughton, 1998, paperback, L14.99, phone 01235 400405, ISBN 0 340 67401 6

It would be easy for busy teachers to overlook this interesting text if skimming through the alternative books available on the shelves of their local store. At first sight it appears to add little new to the range of material already available on the market. It is presented in a plain, business like manner, with the emphasis on text rather than illustration. The format of each chapter is the same, a summary of key points, an outline of theoretical content, and finally three, or four, short case study questions. The experience of the authors as examiners is evident, in that the nature of the tasks set, reflect the demands of A level questions closely. The themes covered are, as the title of the book suggests, determined by the central requirements of the major examination syllabuses. As a result there are few surprises in the topic areas covered, but no obvious omissions either.

The way in which ideas are combined also does little to set it apart from competitors. Limited effort is made to integrate the various strands of the subject. Unit one launches straight into dividing organisations up into different types and classifying them. From this point on each chapter develops an area of theory with very limited attempt to show how ideas are interlinked. The treatment given to Accounting and the Business Environment is more detailed than that extended to Marketing and Human Resource

Management, but this reflects the concerns of students who tend to find these topic areas more difficult.

Strategic policy formation is an area neglected to some extent, with an early unit on The Objectives of Organisations providing the only coverage of the topic. For a reason not entirely clear the text concludes with a section dealing with Employee Relations and Trade Unions, which is treated completely separately from H.R.M. Although there may be sound theoretical reasons for dividing the two into different units it hard to understand why this topic is selected as the theme for the final chapter and appears in a totally separate part of the book. No attempt is made to conclude the publication, or guide the student towards creating their own overview of how the material fits together. The usefulness of the work to teacher and student must therefore be judged on its theoretical content, because it brings no fresh insight into how the subject might be taught, or understood, as a whole. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.