Magazine article Sculpture

Los Angeles

Magazine article Sculpture

Los Angeles

Article excerpt

Mie Olise

Samuel Freeman Gallery

"Noplacia," the title of Danish artist Mie Olise's recent exhibition, is taken from the opening line of the poem that introduces Thomas More's Utopia (1516). More invented both word and concept, basing his visualization of a perfect society on Plato's Republic. Olise's Noplacia, a locale distinguished by abandoned, dystopian, and desolated architectural spaces, opposes this Republic. Her structures embody the idea of "transrealism," a literary form related to science fiction and based on the idea that reality is either constructed or nonexistent.

Working with both organic and geometric forms, Olise blends architecture, art, and psychology. Her objects are provisional, reducing the concept of sculpture to a few minimal precepts. The results resemble temporary structures that have inexplicably fallen in on themselves, becoming non-things in non-spaces. The work is so transitional, so contingent, that it challenges the idea of sculpture as stationary form. A stationary form would suggest a belief in the stable and eternal; this work implies the exact opposite, and a strong wind would completely erase it.

Aside from several fabric wall pieces, the most interesting sculptural work in "Noplacia" consisted of three structures installed in an open-air atrium; the reflective glass around the space, which multiplied the views, made the work appear more substantial than it was. The primary structural elements of all three works consisted of 16-foot lengths of white-painted wood, placed at various angles against the atrium walls. …

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