Magazine article Times Educational Supplement

Love It or Lose It

Magazine article Times Educational Supplement

Love It or Lose It

Article excerpt

Don't you just love armchair educationalists? The notorious aphorism "those who can't, teach" should instead be "those who can't, tell teachers how to teach".

I'm amazed how frequently I'm told what to do by people whose most profound experience of education was being a pupil and whose closest recent encounter with the classroom was attending a conference on education.

That's not to say that we teachers have a better right to express an opinion necessarily, but it does indicate how long and hard you should listen to someone about certain issues. As I am fond of saying, never take behaviour management advice from someone who couldn't run a difficult class - just walk away, laughing.

I'm sometimes asked to appear on daytime television and radio to talk about the controversy du jour, only for the poor researcher to be confused when I say I can't do it because I'm, duh, teaching. Next time you see someone being interviewed about education on the lunchtime news, ask yourselves, "How come they're not covered in glue and glitter, or out lassoing truants?" The answer is usually that they're armchair generals who could just as easily be soapboxing about breastfeeding in public.

Trust people who love what they teach; there's a good chance they might be doing what they teach, too. When I went to school, I loved art, partly because my art teachers were not only teachers but artists. One of them, Dawson Murray, even achieved a degree of local prominence. But all of them smelled of paint and ink and clay (and fags and poverty and ennui). …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.