Magazine article Variety

Costume Designer Cued Swinging '60S

Magazine article Variety

Costume Designer Cued Swinging '60S

Article excerpt

OSCAR-WINNING COSTUME designer Julie Harris, who helped define the swinging looks of 1960s and 70s London, died May 30 in the British capital. She designed for the James Bond film "Live and Let Die" and the Peter Sellers Bond-spoof "Casino Royale," as well as the Beatles' "A Hard Day's Night" and "Help." She was 94 and had suffered a chest infection.

Harris (no relation to the late actress Julie Harris) won an Academy Award for her mod designs in the 1965 Julie Christie-Dirk Bogarde film "Darling." Over a four-decade career, she also served as costume designer on "Goodbye Mr. Chips," with Peter O'Toole; 1975's "Rollerball," the 1979 "Dracula" with Frank Langella, and "The Great Muppet Caper."

The glamorous looks for 1973's "Live and Let Die" helped define the James Bond style, and she also worked with Alfred Hitchcock on 1972's "Frenzy."

Born in London, she studied art before joining court dressmaker Nesta Neve. At 19, she was injured in the WWII bombing of the Cafe de Paris in Piccadilly, when 80 people were killed.

Her first film as a solo designer was the 1947 "Holiday Camp," and she went on to design for films including "Good Time Girl" and "The Sheriff of Fractured Jaw," for which Jayne Mansfield was said to have arrived for her fitting wearing a mink with only underwear beneath it. …

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