Magazine article The Times Higher Education Supplement : THE

Reviewers Aren't on Same Page a Third of Time

Magazine article The Times Higher Education Supplement : THE

Reviewers Aren't on Same Page a Third of Time

Article excerpt

Academic peer reviewers reach completely different conclusions in nearly one case in every three, research suggests.

A study that examined double-blind feedback on conference papers and journal articles in the UK and Australia found that two reviewers were in exact or approximate agreement in 68 per cent of cases: for example, both recommending rejection, or one advocating acceptance without revision and the other supporting acceptance with minor changes.

This meant that reviewers disagreed in 32 per cent of cases, including some where one assessor recommended acceptance without changes and the other called for rejection.

Author Angela Dobele, deputy head of research and innovation at Melbourne's RMIT University, writes that this has time implications for track chairs at academic conferences and journal editors, who have to take a final decision.

"If this process is not undertaken, perhaps in the interest of saving time, a manuscript could be rejected instead of engaging with reviewers and resolving irrelevant or conflicting comments," Dr Dobele says.

The study, which covered 231 submissions to six journals, two conferences and one edited book, also evaluated readers' comments. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.