Magazine article The Tracker

Editor's Notes

Magazine article The Tracker

Editor's Notes

Article excerpt

The only thing more frustrating than not having a stoplist for a particular organ is having two conflicting stoplists or one that you suspect to be incorrect, but cannot prove it. The stoplist for the three-manual 1881 Roosevelt organ in St. Mark's Church, Philadelphia, featured in this issue's EndNotes, is a case in point. The organ was originally built by Hall & Labagh of New York in 1849. In 1867, what was described in the (Philadelphia) Public Ledger (October 24, 1867) as a "new and large organ" was installed. This was done by Hall & Labagh and, as Martin Walsh commented in an email, "nothing in the newspaper suggests a rebuilding of the former organ, although it may have gone unstated."

Fourteen years later, the (Philadelphia) Times (September 27, 1881, p. 3) published an item, "Renovation of St. Mark's Organ," that noted the organ "was built about twelve years ago by Hall & Labagh, and, though in its day a very fine one, it has for some time been out of order." The organ was then "undergoing repairs" by Hilborne Roosevelt and the work was to be thorough. "New sets of pipes will be added, two new water motors are to be introduced" and it was to take a "couple of weeks and several thousand dollars to complete the renovation." Roosevelt's work included a new console as well as key and stop actions; from the above, we can assume, additional ranks were added.

When Austin replaced the Hall & Labagh/Roosevelt in 1902, the old organ was removed and installed in Asbury Methodist Church in Philadelphia by Beaufort J. …

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