Magazine article Black Issues in Higher Education

Young Blacks Disproportionately Exposed to Alcohol Ads, Study Says

Magazine article Black Issues in Higher Education

Young Blacks Disproportionately Exposed to Alcohol Ads, Study Says

Article excerpt

WASHINGTON

Young Blacks see far more than their share of the $333 million worth of advertising placed in major magazines by the nation's alcohol industry, a new university study says.

A report by Georgetown University's Center on Alcohol Marketing and Youth, released last month, said Blacks from 12 to 20 years old saw 77 percent more of these ads in 2002 than their non-Black peers did.

The disproportionate exposure was amplified when the report broke down types of alcohol. Young Blacks saw 81 percent more magazine ads for distilled spirits, the study found.

The report shows "that the industry is directly targeting Black kids," says Rev. Jesse Brown, executive director of the National Association of African Americans for Positive Imagery. "African American kids tend to be trendsetters in what they buy, so the industry thinks if it can get more African American kids to buy, it can also get their White counterparts to buy."

Jack Daniel's was among the largest spenders on alcohol ads that reached Black youth through magazines, the study found.

The whiskey maker denied targeting any underage markets.

"We'll gag at a gnat and swallow a camel before we advertise in anything that's major thrust is under-drinking-age people," says Roger Brashears Jr., Jack Daniel's Lynchburg, Tenn., promotions director.

The magazines that most exposed young Blacks to alcohol ads were Sports Illustrated, Vibe, Cosmopolitan, ESPN The Magazine, Jet, Rolling Stone, Entertainment Weekly, Ebony, In Style, Playboy, GQ, Essence and People. …

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