Magazine article Variety

Frills, Chills Mix for 'Peak' Costumes

Magazine article Variety

Frills, Chills Mix for 'Peak' Costumes

Article excerpt

Kate Hawley has long lamented - mostly in jest - that on her films, she never gets to design the lovely "frocks" she does for the stage. "Every time my agent rings, I go, 'Please tell me it's a frock film,"' she says with a laugh.

With "Crimson Peak," Guillermo del Toro's Victorian-era Gothic romance/ ghost story, Hawley's wish has been granted: She finally gets to showcase her skills with frills.

That's only fitting, since Hawley, a relatively obscure designer Down Under when del Toro first hired her, has seen her star rise in the film world in large part thanks to her association with the director, who took her from theater and opera and put her on Hollywood tentpoles.

He's also been a creative mentor and inspiration, so much so that she gets emotional just talking about him.

"It's always such a waltz, rather than a walk, with Guillermo," she sighs. "The way he structures his pieces, it's always like a piece of music. They're almost defined by acts. I treat the visual beats like music when I listen to Guillermo's notes, because I think that's the poetry he offers in his work."

Hawley first met del Toro when he was in New Zealand prepping to direct "The Hobbit." "I believe we first bonded over our collection of books," she says. "Similar horrors on the shelves."

He picked her to design that film for him, and when his version of the picture fell apart (Peter Jackson ended up in the director's chair), he brought her with him to design "Pacific Rim." That helped her land another sci-fi actioner, Doug Liman's "Edge of Tomorrow." She seems to have made friends at Warner Bros, along the way; her next film is the DC Comics twist on "The Dirty Dozen," David Ayer's "Suicide Squad."

Del Toro loves symbolism, especially color-coding, she says, and that's reflected in the costumes for "Crimson Peak." The heroine, American heiress Edith Cushing (Mia Wasikowska), is often seen in gold, representing wealth - and also, she says, "a canary in a coal mine. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.