Magazine article Variety

George Miller on Matinees and More

Magazine article Variety

George Miller on Matinees and More

Article excerpt

Q&A

Australian filmmaker George Miller, director of "Mad Max: Fury Road." was in L.A. briefly to accept an Environmental Media Award for his work, including his activism on Save Watsons Bay. He spoke with Variety about his early creative influences.

What were some of your early movie experiences?

I was highly influenced by Saturday matinees. It was a ritual of the town where I grew up. There would be an A feature and B feature - or if it was a big Technicolor Cinemascope movie like "Ben-Hur," it would be one movie with an intermission. Plus, cartoons, newsreels, 10-minute serials like "Batman" and "Sir Galahad." There was a relatively new theater in Chinchilla, a town of 4,000-5,000. It had 1,000 seats. There was no Internet, no cell phones, and Australia was late in getting television. So moviegoing was a major ritual and the theater was like a secular cathedral. It was an inadvertent apprenticeship.

Did you want to be a filmmaker?

I never thought I'd be able to make films. There was no opportunity. My twin brother, John, and I went to medical school. One day I walked past a cinema with a movie poster showing a woman's legs, but the top half of her was a hand giving the peace sign. Hm. So I walked in. It was Robert Altman's "MASH." I knew nothing about him or the film. After the movie ended, I walked right out, and then paid to see it at the next show. That was a big deal to buy a movie ticket, much less two, because I was in medical school and didn't have much money. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.