Magazine article New Internationalist

[Everyone's Child]

Magazine article New Internationalist

[Everyone's Child]

Article excerpt

Everyone's Child directed by Tsistsi Dangarembga

Everyone's Child benefits from director Tsitsi Dangarembga's meticulous novelist's eye. Dangarembga is the acclaimed Zimbabwean author of the book Nervous Conditions and this, her first feature film, has a sensitivity and sureness of touch that belies its modest beginnings. It started life as a teaching pack aimed at raising awareness of the plight of children orphaned by AIDS. There are ten million such children in Africa.

In simple, un - melodramatic terms, the film tells the story of a young family's struggle to maintain a livelihood - parallel story lines tracing big sister Tamari's efforts in the home village and brother Itai's troubles in Harare. Tamari has to drop out of school and is forced to recycle and sell goods from a rubbish tip, later submitting to a middle - aged shopkeeper's unwelcome advances. Itai has an equally harrowing time at the hands of gang members, some played by real streetkids.

The film maintains a level of quiet realism throughout. There's a genuine poignancy in the dilemmas and the cast is uniformly excellent throughout. It scores points particularly in its refusal to condemn any single character outright, suggesting instead that morally questionable behaviour owes as much to society's own shortcomings as to any single individual. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.