Magazine article The Spectator

Portrait of the Week

Magazine article The Spectator

Portrait of the Week

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David Cameron, the Prime Minister, after spending a week parrying questions about his late father's investment fund Blairmore, suddenly published a summary showing that on his own taxable income of £200,307 in the past year he had paid tax of £75,898. Downing Street said 'potential prime ministers' and chancellors should be expected to publish their tax returns in future. George Osborne, the Chancellor of the Exchequer, said he had paid £72,210 in tax on earnings or £198,738. Boris Johnson MP said he'd paid £276,505 tax on income of £612,583. Jeremy Corbyn, the leader of the opposition, had not kept a copy of his tax return, but then got hold of one which showed that he'd paid £18,902 tax on £72,645 income. Dennis Skinner, the Labour MP, aged 84, was suspended from the Commons chamber for the day after refusing to withdraw a description of Mr Cameron as 'dodgy Dave'. The annual rate of inflation as measured by the Consumer Prices Index was 0.5 per cent in March, compared with 0.3 per cent in February; measured by the Retail Prices Index it had risen to 1.6 from 1.3 per cent.

The Archbishop of Canterbury took a DNA test at the instance of Charles Moore and found that his father was the late Sir Anthony Montague Browne, Churchill's last private secretary. John Whittingdale said that for about six months before becoming culture secretary he had had an affair with a woman without realising she was a prostitute. Four students accused of raping a woman at the Royal Agricultural University, Cirencester, in 2014 and suspended since then were acquitted when the prosecution offered no evidence. The dismembered remains of a missing policeman were found at a flat in Southwark. Rule the World, ridden by 19-year-old David Mullins, won the Grand National at 33-1. Danny Willett, the son of a vicar from Hackenthorpe, Sheffield, won the Masters at Augusta.

If Britain voted to leave the European Union there could be 'severe regional and global damage', according to Maurice Obstfeld, the chief economist of the International Monetary Fund. In Edinburgh, 17 schools were closed, affecting 7,000 pupils, because of worries about structural defects; a wall had fallen down at Oxgangs primary school on a windy day in January, raising questions about other buildings constructed under Public Private Partnership contracts favoured by the previous Labour-Liberal Democrat coalition in Scotland. …

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