Magazine article Strings

Locals' Tips: Must-See (and Hear) Musical Landmarks

Magazine article Strings

Locals' Tips: Must-See (and Hear) Musical Landmarks

Article excerpt

SYMPHONY HALL

(301 Massachusetts Ave., Boston)

The home of the Boston Symphony and the Boston Pops opened in 1900, and was the first hall designed (by a relative of one of my students!) with scientifically derived acoustical principles. The sound is wonderful- even on the second balcony. On both sides there are small half-moon windows near the ceiling, which had been boarded up in WWI1, and have only recently been uncovered.

THE MUSICAL INSTRUMENT COLLECTION AT THE MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS

(465 Huntington Ave., Boston)

Just a bit further down Huntington Avenue (which connects Symphony Hall and Jordan Hall). Instruments from ancient times to the present, as well as from atound the world, are housed here, including an Amati violin, a five-string 18th-century Belgian cello, a three-string Prescott bass made in New Hampshire, and various lutes and guitars.

ISABELLA STEWART GARDNER MUSEUM

(25 Evans Way, Boston)

Not far from the MFA is the eclectic former home of Isabella Stewart Gardner. The museum opened in 1903, with a performance by the Boston Symphony. The Gardner Museum moved firmly into the 21st century with an addition that includes a jewel of a concert hall, with three floors of audience space that overlooks the performers on the floor. It's a fabulous place to play, and events quickly sell out. H+H plays an annual Brandenburg Concerto extravaganza in December.

HARVARD'S MEMORIAL HALL AND SANDERS THEATER

(45 Quincy St., Cambridge)

The distinctive Victorian Gothic spires of Memorial Hall, a National Historic Landmark, define the skyline just north of Harvard Yard. …

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