Magazine article National Association of School Psychologists. Communique

TBI Assessment, Report Writing, and Intervention

Magazine article National Association of School Psychologists. Communique

TBI Assessment, Report Writing, and Intervention

Article excerpt

TBI Assessment, Report Writing, and Intervention WORKINGWITH TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY IN SCHOOLS: Transition, Assessment, and Intervention By P. B. Jantz, S. C. Davies, & E. D. Bigler 2014, Routledge

REVIEWED BY BRANDON RENNIE

Any school professional can attest to the fact that the awareness of traumatic brain injury (TBI) is on the rise. But does every school psychologist possess the knowledge and skills to provide services to those students who have experienced TBI? The answer likely is no. WorkingWith Traumatic Brain Injury in Schools is a "comprehensive practitioner-based guide to effective school based services for those students who have experienced TBI." TBI is the leading cause of death and disability for children and adolescents, and the effects of disability can persist or worsen over time. Data suggest a large discrepancy between the number of children with brain injuries and the number of children who receive services. The first chapter of this book lays out these statistics and gives the reader a deeper understanding of the context.

According to the authors, the book is targeted at school professionals with limited neurological and neuropsychological expertise, but the depth of information found will make it suitable even for those quite knowledgeable in these areas. In fact, the depth of information covered may be more than what some consider pertinent to a practitioner. For example, two chapters (36 pages) are dedicated to the anatomy and physiology of TBI and a third chapter covers neurological recovery processes. Topics include diffuse axonal injury, complicating factors, and plasticity. By contrast, the chapters on consequences (cognitive, social-emotional, and academic) are short. Some may find a mere seven pages on academic consequences of TBI to be unsettlingly pithy compared to the space dedicated to neurophysiology.

The portions of the book that will likely be the most enticing for practicing school psychologists are the chapters on the TBI School-Based Neuroeducational Needs Assessment Process (TBI-SNNAP) model, report writing, and intervention. …

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