Magazine article The American Organist

The Two Organs of Tewkesbury Abbey (Great European Organs No. 31)

Magazine article The American Organist

The Two Organs of Tewkesbury Abbey (Great European Organs No. 31)

Article excerpt

THE TWO ORGANS OF TEWKESBURY ABBEY (GREAT EUROPEAN ORGANS NO. 31). Adrian Partington, organist. The Milton Organ: V/68, J.W. Walker & Sons reconstruction (1948), with elements of "Father" Willis rebuild (1848), John Holland (Swell addition, 1796), Renatus Harris (remodeling, 1690), and Robert Dallum (original instrument, 1631); The Grove Organ: III/41 Mitchell & Thynne (1885), restored by Bishop & Son (1980-81). Priory Records PRCD 384. Priory.org.uk. Also available as PRCD 5040 at Prestoclassical.co.uk/r/ Priory/PRCD5040. The Abbey Church of St. Mary the Virgin of Tewkesbury, commonly known as Tewkesbury Abbey, is located in the English county of Gloucestershire. A former Benedictine monastery, it is the second largest parish church in England and one of the country's finest examples of Norman architecture, having possibly the largest Romanesque crossing tower in Europe. The Abbey possesses two quintessentially English organs that are distinct in character and provenance, speaking into an amply reverberant space.

The Milton organ was originally built for Magdalene College, Oxford. Oliver Cromwell had it moved to Hampton Court Palace in 1654 (where poet John Milton reportedly played it). After a return to Magdalene in 1660, the organ was finally installed in Tewkesbury Abbey in 1737. The Grove Organ was built for the Inventions Exhibition of 1885, dubbed a "Model Organ" by its builders. It was displayed at the Liverpool Exhibition in 1886, where W.T. Best proclaimed it "the finest organ of its kind I have ever played upon. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.