Magazine article The Spectator

'Black Water', by Louise Doughty - Review

Magazine article The Spectator

'Black Water', by Louise Doughty - Review

Article excerpt

In Indonesia in 1965-6 half a million communists and supposed communist sympathisers were murdered by a range of civilian and paramilitary organisations under the direction of the army.

This is the setting for Louise Doughty's grim, ambitious novel. John Harper is a young operative in Jakarta, working for a Dutch private intelligence operation, providing information for corporations and doing covert work for various governments, chiefly the American. The title refers to the polluted water of Jakarta's canals, but also to the water of the country's paddy fields. To the news-attentive reader there is also the echo of the Blackwater private security operation that got into trouble in Iraq. Most of all, perhaps, it refers to the rain that disguises the approach of death, blocking out sound and traces of movement.

During the massacres Harper commits an act of which he is deeply ashamed. Much of the tension of the book, which somewhat confusingly goes back and forth in time and place, from the USA to Holland to Indonesia, depends on the slow revelation of the details of Harper's shameful act and its consequences.

But it's difficult to feel any sympathy for Harper, despite his moral anguish. That he remains vague and distant may be deliberate, but it is hard on the reader when this figure is almost the only character in the story. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.