Magazine article Times Educational Supplement

Should We Let Children Be Screen and Not Heard?

Magazine article Times Educational Supplement

Should We Let Children Be Screen and Not Heard?

Article excerpt

Thud...Thud...Thud...It's hard to ignore an African elephant slamming into a table top. Dillon liberated it from our wild-animal display area when I refused to let him have a tablet computer. Now he's using it in an attempt to make me change my mind. Apparently, keeping him in at playtime while denying him access to basic technological resources is in contravention of his human rights.

Since Dillon came off Ritalin, tablet computers have been used as a weapon in the ongoing war against his inappropriate behaviour. Dangling the carrot of 10 minutes' tablet time at the end of a lesson encourages him to make the right choices. These include not carrying out random acts of violence in the classroom. Unfortunately, he still carries them out at during the break. "I was only playing Mortal Kombat," he snarls.

Thud...Thud...Thud...I explain that play-fighting is not allowed anywhere in school. This is especially important when your opponent objects to being punched, kicked and thrown. "If you want to play 'Kombat' games, use an imaginary friend and play them by yourself."

For a moment, the elephant relents and Dillon stares at me like I'm several pixels short of a recognisable image. "How am I supposed to play by myself if you won't let me have a tablet?" he sneers.

Thud...Thud...Thud...I want to tell him that the best graphics are in his head, but the onslaught of beast on MDF has resumed. After a while, its hypnotic rhythm evokes memories of long-forgotten summers playing alone on the drive of our council house. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.