Magazine article The Spectator

Mr Milosevic Urges Britons to 'Cast Out' Mr Blair

Magazine article The Spectator

Mr Milosevic Urges Britons to 'Cast Out' Mr Blair

Article excerpt

Mr Blair has appealed to the Serbian people to `cast out' Mr Milosevic and bring back `real democracy' to Serbia. We may be sure that, in turn, Mr Milosevic will appeal to the British people to `cast out' Mr Blair and bring back `real democracy' to Britain.

If he does issue such a call, it will be inesponsible of Mr Milosevic. For Mr Blair to appeal to Serbians to cast out Mr Milosevic is one thing, but Mr Milosevic should realise that the British live under a ruthless regime. Any dissent is crushed. It is all very well for Mr Milosevic to urge the British to rebel. He is doing so from the safety of Serbia, where those in danger from Nato's bombs are mainly junior television staff or, further down the road in Kosovo, fleeing Albanian refugees. He is in no danger from Blair's police -- ruthlessly enforcing multiculturalism and sensitivity on white males, smokers, heterosexuals, Tories, and other dissenters. The British are in a rather more dangerous situation than Mr Milosevic.

Mr Milosevic thinks he can influence events in a remote country on the edge of Europe, hundreds of miles from Serbia, and with many countries in-between which would be reluctant to give over-flying rights. Until this crisis arose, he would have been hard put to find, say, Chelsea on a map. Yet it is the ordinary people of such places as Chelsea and South Kensington -the ethnic Tories - who would have to lead any uprising against the Blair regime, and who would have to endure the resultant reprisals.

Mr Milosevic probably toys with the ancient idea of the so-called Greater Chelsea, stretching westwards along the lawless M4 to Wiltshire. It is true that, ethnically, Chelsea and Wiltshire are similar. Chelsea people spend their weekends there, swigging the local rotgut such as Lanson and Pimms, and chomping such regional foods as polenta, sushi and taramasalata. But Mr Milosevic seems to be ignorant of the reality that many Britons to the west of Chelsea have gone over to the Blair regime, after it bribed them with no income-tax increases and lower capital gains tax. In the villages, they chant: `We had Peter to stay last week. He was so interesting about making it illegal not to be rich. He still talks to Blair every hour.' Any rebels, operating in Wiltshire, would run the risk of being handed over to the authorities by local collaborators. Every now and then Mr Milosevic's spokesmen, such as Jamie Sheaovich, claim to discern 'cracks' in the Blair regime. But the evidence suggests that incidents such as the bombardment of Goldman Sachs' staff with money has brought about a middleand upper-class rallying to the regime. At such times, the people are prepared to embrace the ruling ideology of panBlairism - an alliance which attributes Blairism to all the most influential, if mutually hostile, groups in the country, such as transvestites, non-smokers, Sikhs, Saabs, Volvos, etc. To Sikhs, Mr Blair implies that he is a Sikh, to transsexual lap-dancers that he is a transsexual lap-dancer, and so on. Only Tories are excluded, apart from Mr Kenneth Clarke and Mr Chris Patten, whom the regime see as potential leaders of a collaborationist Tory party. But the Tories are the most widely hated minority in the country, and as such are useful to the regime. …

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