Magazine article The Spectator

'Do Not Say We Have Nothing', by Madeleine Thien - Review

Magazine article The Spectator

'Do Not Say We Have Nothing', by Madeleine Thien - Review

Article excerpt

Madeleine Thien's third novel, recently long-listed for the Man Booker Prize, begins in Vancouver with Marie, who, like the author, is the daughter of Chinese immigrants to Canada. Marie tells us that her father committed suicide in 1989 and that, soon after, the 19-year-old Ai-ming -- whose father knew Marie's father -- came to stay, having escaped China in the aftermath of Tiananmen.

Ai-ming is drawn to a notebook that has been found among Marie's father's surviving paperwork: a handwritten copy of part of a mysterious Book of Records . Marie persuades Ai-ming to tell her the story. Her tale transpires to be not the content of that book, but the crucial role it has played in the lives of their families.

She begins in 1949 -- when Wen, a poet, wins the heart of Swirl, a singer, by sending her chapter-by-chapter transcriptions of the book -- and ends in Tiananmen 50 years later. Swirl, like many readers of the Book of Records , finds it to be an uncanny echo of her life:

On its surface, the story was a simple epic, chronicling the fall of empire; but the people trapped inside the book reminded her of people she tried not to remember -- her brothers and parents, her lost husband and son.

The book becomes a way of defying the political regime, and the act of storytelling becomes a means of surviving a brutal history. The power of words is shown to cut both ways, however, as Thien highlights how often writing is used to enforce the horrors of the revolution. …

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