Magazine article Parenting for High Potential

From a Counselor's Perspective

Magazine article Parenting for High Potential

From a Counselor's Perspective

Article excerpt

In several of my research studies of gifted youth, hidden distress emerged as a common concern. Whether it was bully targets, GLBTQ adolescents, troubled teens self-medicating with illegal drugs, high achievers meeting a nemesis, or children and teens struggling with depression, many told neither parents nor teachers of their sadness, anxiety, or fear. Many said they needed to "figure it out" themselves. Some worried that their distress would disappoint, alarm, or be toxic for those adults. Some feared conflict. They protected their well-honed public image.

With these findings in mind, I offer the following:

Gifted kids must learn to ask for help-for social, emotional, and academic concerns. They can "teach" their parents, grandparents, teachers, coaches, and directors about their stressors, doubts, and limitations.

Being able to talk about social and emotional life is likely to benefit future relationships in the workplace, in marriage/ partnership, in parenting, and with peers. Having opportunities in school to meet with intellectual peers to discuss "growing up" helps develop expressive language.

Through struggle, gifted kids develop resilience and gain confidence in their ability to persevere. …

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