Magazine article Academe

Some Virginia Schools Reluctant to Take on Student Teachers

Magazine article Academe

Some Virginia Schools Reluctant to Take on Student Teachers

Article excerpt

SOME SCHOOLS IN VIRGINIA HAVE declined to work with teachers-intraining, fearing they might decrease student scores on new statewide exams. In February, state delegate Marian Van Landingham (D) called a hearing before the House Education Committee to discuss the problem; she first heard about it from Janet Johnson, dean of the College of Human Resources and Education at Virginia Tech. Along with Johnson, deans from the College of William and Mary, Virginia Commonwealth University, and Christopher Newport University attended the hearing.

"Teachers are worried that they can't handle training a student teacher while trying to prepare their own students for the exams," explains Johnson. Last spring, thousands of students in Virginia took the state's Standards of Learning (SOL) tests for the first time. Each year, students in grades 3, 5, and 8 will take exams in mathematics, English, history, and social science, and high school students will complete tests in eight subject areas. By 2004, high school students will have to answer 60 to 70 percent of the questions correctly on most SOL exams in order to graduate. By 2007, if 70 percent of a school's students fail to pass the exit exams, the school will lose its state accreditation.

Johnson says the hearing helped educate state lawmakers about a disturbing trend. "The success of new teachers," argues Johnson, "is directly related to the amount of time they spend in the classroom. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.