Magazine article The Hispanic Outlook in Higher Education

Cooke Foundation Recommends Actions Top Colleges Should Take to Increase Enrollment of Low-Income Students

Magazine article The Hispanic Outlook in Higher Education

Cooke Foundation Recommends Actions Top Colleges Should Take to Increase Enrollment of Low-Income Students

Article excerpt

LANSDOWNE, Va. - The Jack Kent Cooke Foundation has released an issue brief recommending actions that top colleges and universities should take to increase campus diversity by enrolling greater numbers of academically qualified low-income students.

The issue brief comes a day after a U.S. Supreme decision rejecting a challenge to race-conscious affirmative action admissions in the case of Fisher v. the University of Texas at Austin.

"Particularly in light of the Supreme Court's ruling in the Fisher case, the need for expanding affirmative action to cover economic discrimination against academically qualified students in college admissions is critical," said Cooke Foundation Executive Director Fiarold O. Levy. "As the Supreme Court observed, 'diversity takes many forms.'"

"To create equal educational opportunity for every student to rise as high as his or her talents make possible, it's important to tear down unfair college admission barriers standing in the way of students regardless of their income," Levy said.

"All our recommendations are proven, practical and reasonable," Levy added. "We've studied what actions have been taken by colleges that have successfully increased their enrollment of outstanding low-income students, and now we're recommending that other colleges do the same types of things."

The new Cooke Foundation issue brief calls on America's most selective higher education institutions to:

* Make absolutely clear the true cost of college attendance after financial aid because many low-income students and their parents are deterred from even applying by "sticker shock." They are simply unaware that college financial aid can dramatically cut the cost.

* Establish programs to encourage more low-income students to apply for admission because only three percent of students at America's top colleges and universities come from poor families, compared to 72 percent from wealthy families. …

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