Magazine article Washington Report on Middle East Affairs

Obituaries

Magazine article Washington Report on Middle East Affairs

Obituaries

Article excerpt

Donald A. Kruse, 85, died Sept. 8 in La Grange Park, IL. Born in Springfield, PA, he received a BA from Wheaton College, IL; an MA from the University of Pennsylvania; and graduated from the National War College. After serving two years in the U.S. Army he joined the U.S. Department of State in 1957. During his 32-year-career as a Foreign Service Officer he served as deputy consul general at the American Consulate in Jerusalem, and became aware of the wrongs the Palestinian people endured on a daily basis. After retiring, he served on the board of the Holy Land Christian Ecumenical Foundation (HCEF) and led annual pilgrimages. "Don's devotion was unwavering for justice and peace in the Middle East, especially for the Palestinian people," he wife, Sally, said. "His steadfast commitment led many people, including me, to recognize the plight of the Palestinians, and he encouraged us all to believe that one day justice would prevail."

Stanley K. Sheinbaum, 96, died of natural causes in his home in Los Angeles, California on Sept. 12. Born in the Bronx to parents who were recent immigrants from Lithuania, he worked many odd jobs growing up in New York until he was drafted into the Army during World War II. Following his military service, he was accepted to Oklahoma A&M (now Oklahoma State University) and later transferred to Stanford University, where he graduated with a degree in economics. A vocal liberal progressive activist, his notable achievements include being instrumental in working with and persuading the Greek military junta to release former Prime Minister Andreas Papandreou, assisting in raising funds to defend Daniel Ellsberg after he was charged with leaking Pentagon Papers regarding the Vietnam War, and overseeing the campaign to oust Los Angeles Police Chief Daryl F. Gates after the beating of Rodney King. He also urged Yasser Arafat and the PLO to move away from violence and recognize Israel, helping pave the way for the historic handshake between Arafat and Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin at the signing of the Oslo accords on the White House lawn in 1993. "I did it for Israel," he said.

Nahed Hattar, 56, was shot and killed Sept. 25 outside a courthouse in Amman, Jordan, where he had been on trial for posting on social media a cartoon deemed offensive to Islam. After he posted the cartoon, he received many death threats over the Internet. He was born in Amman and attended the University of Jordan. Raised Christian, he later moved away from his religious roots and identified as an atheist. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.