Magazine article The Crisis

Waikinya Clanton Has a Noble Mission for Women and Girls

Magazine article The Crisis

Waikinya Clanton Has a Noble Mission for Women and Girls

Article excerpt

Waikinya Clanton is the executive director of the National Organization of Black Elected Legislative Women (NOBEL Women). A native of Canton, Miss., Clanton Is a 2008 graduate of Tougaloo College In Tougaloo, Miss., where she majored In sociology with an emphasis In pre-law. She worked as a Congressional Black Caucus Foundation Intern for Rep. Bennie Thompson (DMlss.) and later as the executive assistant to the president of the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation. Clanton returned to Rep. Thompson's office as a staff assistant legislative correspondent. During the same time she served two terms as president of the Congressional Black Associates. Clanton became executive director of NOBEL Women In 2013 and talked to The Crisis about the organization's goals and mission.

Tell me about NOBEL Women.

NOBEL Women Is the National Organization of Black Elected Legislative Women. Our group was founded by state legislators. We represent more than 259 women from 43 of the 50 states here In America. Our primary goal Is to ensure that we're creating a culture where women are successful. We really focus on creating holistic leaders, so whether these women want to become members of a legislative body or elected office or they want to pursue corporate or nonprofit roles or management roles, we want to make sure that we provide them with the tools and resources they need to be successful.

Tell me about some of the organization's programs.

We like to say that anything that touches a woman, we touch It. We have our Leadership Training and Educational Development Institute to train women who are Interested In leadership. That's at the core of our fabric. We also host leadership retreats and policy summits. Most recently we've adopted a STEM (Science, Technology Engineering and Math and STEAM (Science, Technology Engineering, Arts and Math) Initiative to really promote education among African-American girls between the ages of 8 and 18. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.