Magazine article National Urban League. The State of Black America

2016 Metropolitan Unemployment Equality Index(TM)

Magazine article National Urban League. The State of Black America

2016 Metropolitan Unemployment Equality Index(TM)

Article excerpt

Two years ago, the National Urban League introduced rankings of unemployment and income equality between whites, Blacks and Latinos in the nation's largest metropolitan areas. Comparison of the 2015 and 2016 Metro Unemployment Equality Index ranking reveals that there was significant shuffling of metros at the top of the list. In both the Black-White and Hispanic-White rankings, only three of the cities in last year's top 10 were also in this year's top 10. On the other hand, many of the metros at the bottom of last year's rankings remained at the bottom of this year's rankings as well.

These patterns seem to represent differences in the pace of recovery across the country as metros at the top of the list averaged larger improvements in unemployment rates than those at the bottom of the list, especially among Blacks and Latinos.

The tables herein highlight major cities, as well as the most and least equal metropolitan areas and those with highest and lowest unemployment.

The full list of Black-White and Hispanic-White 2016 Metro Unemployment Equality Index rankings, complete with a comparison to 2015, can be found in additional tables on www.stateofblackamerica.org.

BLACK-WHITE UNEMPLOYMENT EQUALITY

With an index of 68.7 percent, the Providence-Warwick, RI-MA metro area once again tops the list as the metro area with the smallest Black-White unemployment gap. The Black unemployment rate in Providence was 9.9 percent (down 3.1 percentage points) and the white rate was 6.8 percent (down 1.7 percentage points). With an index of 67 percent, this year's second most equal metro area, Chattanooga, TN-GA, is up from #51 last year, reflecting a decline of more than six percentage points in the area's Black unemployment rate, while the white rate was virtually unchanged.

Similar to the 2015 rankings, the 2016 rankings reveal that metros with the greatest unemployment equality are not necessarily the metros with the best employment outcomes for either group. …

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