Magazine article Sculpture

June Kelly Gallery

Magazine article Sculpture

June Kelly Gallery

Article excerpt

New York

Joan Giordano

Joan Giordano's recent exhibition "Woven in Time" spoke to both the history of art and postmodern phenomena. Her constructions, which straddle the boundaries of painting, collage, and sculpture, can be compared to Kurt Schwitters's "Merz" assemblages or Ellsworth Kelly's 1956-57 wall reliefs, though they hold more in common with the postmodern stylistic developments of Marela Zacarias's "Supple Beat" architectonic sculptures. But unlike Zacarias's colorful, formally bound sculptural reliefs, Giordano's works investigate current issues and the politics of underlying prejudices. She uses newspaper and magazine texts to express her ongoing engagement with events such as the WikiLeaks scandal. The sculptural relief Free Press declares Giordano's interest in justice, and like Honoré Daumier's Freedom of the Press: Don't Meddle With It, the work is meant as a warning. Like Daumier, Giordano makes use of satirical, sometimes scathing double entendre, dedicating her work to human dignity, honesty, and fair play.

Although her sculptures are filled with meaningful textual content, they are also extremely beautiful and expertly made works. In this show, they covered the gallery walls, gaining power in their culmination by curving rhythmically in Giordano's inimitably grand style. Wind Lan terns undulates, spreading its wings like an eagle into the night, for as purposeful as Giordano's means appear, they also incorporate accident. Using such free and seemingly fortuitous methods- such as the flying white brushstroke that allows some of the background color to be seen-is very daring. …

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