Magazine article Sculpture

Rose Art Museum

Magazine article Sculpture

Rose Art Museum

Article excerpt

Waltham, Massachusetts Sarah Sze Rose Art Museum

Sarah Sze is known for her complicated, sprawling sculptures, accumulations of small quotidian things that add up to enigmatic and overwhelming impressions. The meaning of her works is often subsidiary to the simple, ungraspable, in-yourface complexity of each piece.

In Timekeeper (2016), her multifarious accretion became smaller and more unified than in many of her previous works. Improbably, instead of building the work out to the edges of all three sculptural dimensions, she managed to add the fourth dimension. The work, which was accompanied by projections, occupied a large, darkened gallery. This is the first video work I have seen from Sze; in typical fashion, she approached it from a unique perspective. Instead of focusing on one screen, she mounted several projectors on a central rotating axis, using the walls as screens. Videos and still photos raced and dawdled across the walls, like memories surfacing and vanishing.

Then there were multiple smaller screens, down to one-by-two-inch projections beaming the date and time from Delhi, Los Angeles, Sydney, Santiago, Mexico City, London, and the Solomon Islands-a sample from every time zone on the planet. Now and then a random shot, perhaps of the ambient scene, inserted itself. Intermediate screens, scattered and tucked among static components, displayed ocean waves, smoke, and the implosion of a building. Front and not quite center, a blinking digital clock kept accurate time. Off to one side, a metronome swung wildly. Pie-image visuals swept minute after minute. …

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