Magazine article National Parks

Off the Grid

Magazine article National Parks

Off the Grid

Article excerpt

Many of us, at some point, dream about getting away from it all. Especially in these turbulent times, when the endless flow of media can feel oppressive, most people can relate to the urge to escape for an hour, a week, a month.

Richard Proenneke's escape lasted 30 years. In May 1968, he arrived at a remote spot on the edge of Alaska's Lake Clark and built a log cabin that he lived in until he was 82. He occasionally had supplies flown in, but he largely lived off the land, spending his days fishing, hiking, canoeing, picking blueberries, observing nature and keeping journals. Proenneke's quiet adventure ultimately became well known through his writings and films about his life, and decades later, his story still captivates and moves people. Alan and Laurel Bennett, who were guides at the cabin for six summers, said some visitors - awed by the feeling of walking straight into a beloved book - broke down in tears when they first saw Proenneke's home in what is now Lake Clark National Park and Preserve. …

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