Magazine article New Internationalist

Go Fish

Magazine article New Internationalist

Go Fish

Article excerpt

American director Rose Troche and writer Guinevere Turner make an auspicious debut with their summery and light lesbian romance Go Fish. Made on the lowest of budgets the film stands out for its innovative and imaginative approach. The grainy black and white photography, the punchy editing and rapping dialogue give it a distinct breezy style. Certainly Go Fish is a fresh film in all senses as it follows young Max (played in perky fashion by Turner), an aspiring writer whose mind wanders in a wonderfully picaresque fashion, in her search for love one summer. What does a girl do when she hasn't had a date for ten months? Her flatmate Kia, a college lecturer, decides to try and set her up with Ely, one of her ex - students. An awkward date follows in which nothing seems to go particularly swimmingly for Max and Ely. But their friends know otherwise: the secret of love, like comedy, is in the timing.

Aesthetics apart, one of the most welcome features of Go Fish is that it is a lesbian story that moves on from the 'coming out' theme of films such as Donna Deitch's Desert Hearts. …

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