Magazine article New Internationalist

(Various Artists. Freedom from Debt: Vol 2)

Magazine article New Internationalist

(Various Artists. Freedom from Debt: Vol 2)

Article excerpt

By the time this issue of NI reaches you, the first democratic election in South Africa will have been held -- an event without parallel in the country's history. Sekunjalo -- the first album to be given official endorsement by the ANC -- is something of a landmark too.

The album has its sights set firmly on an international market. It is masterfully produced and its predominantly English language lyrics and music -- much of which takes a sophisticated, Africanized soul as its base point -- reflect this. Among the 12 contributing artists it is jazz trumpeter Hugh Masekela whose name is probably best known. Come on Everybody is a slow, bluesy number which contrasts dramatically with the prevalent party mood of the rest of the album. Its lyrics take note of both South Africa's violent history and the continuing violence in the rest of Africa.

Masekela puts the album into a context that transcends celebration. However, Sekunjalo's range of performers -- many of them stars in their domestic market -- reflects the country's diversity and the desire for peace. Jennifer Ferguson, whose Bread and Roses is a light soul song, is an Afrikaans singer who sang at Chris Hani's vigil, while Lebo Morake, from Soweto, uses a mix of rap and highlife to send Set Them Free onto the dance floors.

Considering the serious subject matter behind Freedom from Debt's second compilation album, it's salutary that all 11 songs are united in up - tempo mood. The album which is put together by Britain's leading campaigners for world development concerns itself with Third World debt. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.