Magazine article Black Issues in Higher Education

Winners: Hurston/Wright Fiction Awards Presented

Magazine article Black Issues in Higher Education

Winners: Hurston/Wright Fiction Awards Presented

Article excerpt

Winners: Hurston/Wright Fiction Awards Presented.

WASHINGTON, DC -- Four emerging African-American fiction writers, whose works weave together stories about family, relationships and the need for connections within each person's life were honored for their writing as the Zora Neale Hurston/Richard Wright Award winners for 1995. The awards were presented recently at the Great Hall of the Charles Sumner Museum & Archives.

"Every year the writing of these new African-American voices has gotten even stronger," said Marita Golden, executive director of the Hurston/Wright Foundation. The foundation is housed at Virginia Commonwealth University, where Golden serves as a faculty member in its graduate creative writing program.

The Hurston/Wright awards are presented annually for the best fiction writing by African-American college students enrolled full time as undergraduate or graduate students in any U.S. college or university.

"In their works, these African-American writers were able to capture the flavor of our families and their relationships to present a fresh commentary on our society," Golden said.

The Hurston/Wright program is the nation's only contest designed to foster future writing by emerging African-American writers. The first-place winner receives $1,000 and publication of the submission in the "New Virginia Review" magazine, and the second-place winner receives $500.

The 1995 winners, selected from nearly 50 entries, are:

First Place, Monifa A. …

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