Magazine article The Spectator

Letters

Magazine article The Spectator

Letters

Article excerpt

Like-minded

From Andrew Jones

Sir: Mark Strauss's analysis of the new anti-Semitism ('Who hates the Jews now?', 29 November) is a chilling reminder that the far Right and the anti-globalisation movement have much in common in their detestation of global capitalism. Both are collectivist in nature, favouring heavy regulation of the market, and have a visceral dislike of the bourgeoisie, seen as agents of that system.

In Britain, the Stop the War Coalition, a rag-bag of far-Left groups and anti-capitalists, have teamed up with Islamic fundamentalists, jettisoned any pretence of human rights and publicly prefer the former regimes in Afghanistan and Iraq. It's no accident that the British National party also supports this coalition.

Here in Paris, things are even worse. The suburbs inhabited by many North Africans are virulently anti-Semitic, while many educated professionals see globalisation as some sort of capitalist plot hatched by a conspiracy of international Jewish financiers in Washington. It would be laughable if such views were not so dangerous.

Andrew Jones

Paris

Proud to be lazy

From Barbara Field

Sir: Rod Liddle's assertion ('Women who won't', 29 November) that women who choose to stay at home are merely lazy and idle is . . . spot on in my case.

I stopped working two weeks before my first child was born. He is now 17. I have no intention whatsoever of going back to work. I am not one of these 'stay-at-home mothers who actually don't stay at home'; I do stay at home and do mostly bugger all throughout the day. I get up to get the children ready for school, and once that's done I go back to bed with a cup of tea and the Daily Telegraph.

I play around on the computer, read books and The Spectator and make odd forays into town for essentials. I bestir myself in the evening to provide a (usually) cooked-from-scratch dinner for husband and bratlings and then feel suitably self-righteous.

I am, of course, taking a great risk in writing this letter, for if it gets printed and my husband reads it. . . .

Barbara Field

Devon

From Madeline Cutts-Watson

Sir: I nearly choked on my bonbons and fell off my chaise-longue when reading Rod Liddle's preposterous claim that some women who stay at home are bone-idle.

Only this very morning my channel-changer's batteries went flat and I'm having to walk over to the television each time I want to change channels.

Tell him to get some sense of perspective!

Madeleine Cutts-Watson

Guernsey, Channel Islands

From Elizabeth Frimston

Sir: I have stuck pages 18 and 19 of this week's issue together so that my husband won't get to read Rod Liddle's blasphemous article. I've been lounging about at home - cosy out of the rain, feet up, eating chocolates, occasionally rousing myself for a little light dusting and charity work - for 15 years now and have no intention of letting some creepy journalist ruin it for me. Thank goodness I've the time to spot these things and head off trouble.

Elizabeth Frimston

London SW1

From Dr Philip M. Peverley

Sir: Rod Liddle has opened my eyes this morning with his radical theory on working women, or rather non-working women.

In general practice the situation is even worse. The vast majority of male GPs work full time, while the minority of female GPs do so. Also, they are much less likely to take on full partnership, with the added responsibility and paperwork that comes with it. And yet I had never thought of my female colleagues as the bunch of idle sods that I now see they are. Decades of subliminal equality indoctrination had left me rationalising thus: women must have more sensible priorities than we do.

However, I now see the truth, and Rod Liddle must be praised for having the capacity to think and express such thoughts, even after working all those years for the BBC. He is a genuine free-thinker. …

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