Magazine article Work & Family Life

Is Eggs Research Something to Crow About?

Magazine article Work & Family Life

Is Eggs Research Something to Crow About?

Article excerpt

Are eggs okay again? So it seems, according to some well-publicized studies on the subject. Let's look a bit closer at what the new research suggests.

First, it's true that eggs offer complete protein as well as iron, zinc and the B and D vitamins, with only a small amount of saturated fat. Trouble is, the yolk of a medium-size egg contains about 215 milligrams of cholesterol, more than two-thirds the daily recommended "maximum intake" of 300.

Nutrition researchers emphasize the tremendous "individual variability" of dietary cholesterol. That is, adding or subtracting an egg from your daily diet may, or may not, have a significant effect on, your blood cholesterol. Men and women may respond differently as well. Indeed, many factors play a role in determining cholesterol levels and their impact on heart-disease risk.

Of course, no one ever said that eggs cause heart attacks or that not eating them will keep you healthy. If you eat eggs for breakfast, pizza for lunch and a steak for dinner, cutting out the eggs may not help much, if at all. You'd probably be better off eating an egg for breakfast, a vegetarian lunch and boneless breast of chicken for dinner.

The American Heart Association offers this advice: if you are healthy and know that your cholesterol is at a desirable level, you can eat up to four eggs a week, which includes eggs in baked goods and other recipes. …

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