Magazine article Techniques

Small World

Magazine article Techniques

Small World

Article excerpt

A few years ago, I attended a conference designed to show me how to use the budding Internet to be a better reporter. I remember listening to the speakers, furiously taking notes and wondering how this new medium would really affect me.

Turns out, quite a bit. Within a year, we were coding each of our stories to be placed on our newspaper's Web site, so my grandparents in Kentucky or Louisiana could read the articles I wrote about a Birmingham, Ala., suburb-the same day they ran in our print edition. When my husband and I moved to the Washington, D.C., area last summer, we used the Internet to check out each community, search home listings and I even scouted job opportunities.

Now, the Internet has crossed into another realm that will affect just about everyone: education. In high school, I spent hours at the library doing research reports (OK, I talked with my friends a little, too). If I wanted to use a graphic I found in a book, I could copy it for 10 cents a page or try to reproduce it myself. Now my 10-year-old sister Alex can whip out a report in no time, even downloading charts or pictures she might want, thanks to the power of the Internet (and my parents' computer). When Alex enters high school in a few years, she'll be able to explore classes I never dreamed of taking at her age-all with the help of the World Wide Web. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.