Magazine article Information Today

First Statistically Defensible Survey of the Internet's Size

Magazine article Information Today

First Statistically Defensible Survey of the Internet's Size

Article excerpt

O'Reilly & Associates, Inc. has gone public with the details of a three-phase survey of the true size and composition of the Internet. "Never has so much money been invested, based on so little information," said Dick Peck, O'Reilly's vice president of Business Development. "With this study, we intend to build a picture of the Internet market based on facts, not hype." Working for the past eight months in conjunction with Trish Information Services, a leading market research firm in Hayward, California, O'Reilly announced that Phase I of this program entitled "Defining the Internet Opportunity 1994-1995," a study of subscribers to the Internet's Global Network Navigator (GNN), has been completed and will be made available to companies and organizations participating in Phases II and III.

Phase I consisted of an nth-name sample of 2,052 registered users of the Global Network Navigator (GNN), O'Reilly's online Internet navigation service. Highlights of Phase I indicate that 71 percent of the Internet GNN subscribers are between the ages of 25 and 45; 60 percent have postgraduate study or degrees; 67 percent had 1994 household incomes of $50,000 or more; and, 72 percent who had made a purchasing transaction said they made the purchases based upon information obtained online. Twelve percent even Said they planned on buying a car because of information accessed over the Internet.

Phases II and III broaden the study to the total Internet audience. Unlike other surveys of the Internet, Phase II of the O'Reilly research will begin outside the Internet by using random digit dialing. The object of Phase II is to determine the true size of the Internet audience as a function of the incidence rate among U.S. households. A sufficiently large sample will be used to project Internet size with a less than one percent sampling error of 95 percent confidence. …

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