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MIT and Geac to Co-Develop Client/server Systems for Academi

Magazine article Information Today

MIT and Geac to Co-Develop Client/server Systems for Academi

Article excerpt

The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in Cambridge, Massachusetts, has signed an agreement with Geac Computers, Inc. that establishes a collaborative working relationship to develop a client/server library system geared toward large academic/research libraries. MIT will first install the Geac Advance System to be operational this summer and will work with Geac and other Geac academic/research libraries to co-develop the client/server system for the summer of 1996. The new system is based on Geac's GEOS2 client/server line.

Geac's GEOS2 line of client/server products leverages the power of client workstations to provide graphical user interfaces, robust network connectivity, and compliance with interoperability standards, such as Z39.50, to provide fast data access, distributed processing, knowledge-based information retrieval from bibliographic and journal citations, and Z39.50 gateways to a variety of multimedia and non-MARC databases.

The Geac/MIT co-development plan provides for collaborative work to design, build, and produce a client/server library operation system for large academic/research libraries. The plan is based on user-centered development processes whereby Geac and MIT work together closely throughout the development process.

The co-development plan takes advantage of the extensive client/server experience and the robust, diverse information technology infrastructure at MIT, and Geac's long-standing commitment to academic/research libraries. The extremely close proximity between Geac and MIT ensures frequent communications, interchange, testing, and evaluation. Beyond overall coordination of the client/server system development, MIT and Geac have identified the following areas of special interest and development: technical services (all acquisitions and cataloging functions); circulation (including reserves, both traditional and electronic); public access (including interoperability with other network clients such as World Wide Web browsers); visual images; and archives management.

At an infrastructure level, MIT and Geac will collaborate on system architecture, network integration, security, and administration development. …

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