Magazine article Black Issues in Higher Education

Food for Thought

Magazine article Black Issues in Higher Education

Food for Thought

Article excerpt

Food for Thought

Those prophetic words attest to Jesus' greatness, because the poor and starving continue to be with us and probably always will be commonplace in this system of things. These conditions persist in spite of our scientific and technical know-how, not to mention our ability to feed the world's population many times over. Yet because of our inability to overcome greed, war and political strife, more than 34,000 people die each year of starvation. They are part of a group of more than 14 million people who die of hunger-related causes each year. And half of those dying are children.

Even here in America, the land of plenty, terms such as "food insecure" have entered the lexicon. More than 10 percent of American households are food insecure -- meaning they cut the size of meals, or skip them altogether. This, in a country where the government pays farmers to let their fields lie fallow.

What about those well-funded, sympathy-evoking domestic and international hunger relief funds? A scathing report a few years back in the Chicago Tribune found that these organizations pull in hundreds of millions of dollars from well-intentioned but ignorant donors while the starving children they purport to care for get nothing, or next to nothing. I could go on, but you get the message.

Where does higher education fit in? What is the academy's role in alleviating some of this misery? Joan Morgan accepted the challenging task of looking at what our colleges are doing to prepare a new generation of scholars to tackle this perpetual problem. …

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