Magazine article The New Yorker

Dinerbar;

Magazine article The New Yorker

Dinerbar;

Article excerpt

1569 Lexington Ave., between 100th and 101st Sts. (212-348-0200)--A young pioneer who moved uptown from SoHo to Carnegie Hill a few years ago dubbed the neighborhood--defensively, hopefully, facetiously--the "New Bohemia," or NuBoHo, in an attempt to promote it to skeptical friends. The name, not to mention the sentiment, failed to catch on, and those who pined for NuBoHo were forced to look further north. Dinerbar sits atop a doozy of a hill in what real-estate brokers call Carnegie Hill North--Spanish Harlem, to the rest of the world. The place is spare, roomy, and unassuming: plate glass, ceramic tile, exposed brick, something junky on a big TV, secondhand tabloids by the door. One corner is occasionally taken over by a band or a d.j. There are well-chosen wines and dozens of beers, but no hard liquor, owing to the presence, across the street, of a Life Changers church. The kitchen is open for all to see, and people from the neighborhood drift in and out, in a college-town kind of way. The conversations often seem to be about what happened at Dinerbar the night before.

What comes out of that kitchen, in giant but prettified portions on big rectangular plates, is diner food, comfort food, square-meal food. …

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