Magazine article Black Masks

Experiencing the Production Process

Magazine article Black Masks

Experiencing the Production Process

Article excerpt

Experiencing The Production Process

It is not an easy feat to get a play produced. One usually has to send out many scripts, knock on doors, pound pavements, and accept lots of rejections. I have had three plays produced. My first two plays were written as acting vehicles for myself. It sometimes happens that when actors can't find work, they create some. My first play, One for Tulamae, a one-woman narrative adapted from a short story written by Stanley Crouch, was produced at Universal Jazz Coalition (UJC) and ran for a year on Manhattan Cable. My second play, Peaces of Minds, a jazz-drama was produced at UJC, The Gene Frankel Theatre, and at the Greenwich House. It featured many celebrity jazz musicians, and for that reason was the first theatre piece presented in the annual Greenwich Village Jazz Festival. My most recent play, Still Life Goes On, was presented at Henry Street Settlement, October 24-26, 1997. The entire process took several months. It was very exciting and a lot of hard work!

Jonathan Ward, director of the drama program at Henry Street, presented my play along with four others as part of the Abrons Arts Center Playwrights Project. In this project, playwrights are given an opportunity to develop their new plays with the minimum expectation that they present a wellrehearsed script-in-hand reading at the end. My grand vision was to have an elaborately staged play: costumes, set, lights, the works. I found that the most essential ingredient for any production is the correct personnel. …

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