WASHINGTON UPDATE: Ugandan, U.S. Medical Schools Develop Low Cost AIDS Treatment

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WASHINGTON UPDATE: Ugandan, U.S. Medical Schools Develop Low Cost AIDS Treatment

The National Institutes of Health announced last month that a joint Uganda-U.S. study has found a highly effective, safe, and inexpensive drug regimen for preventing the transmission of HIV from an infected mother to her newborn.

The research teams that made the discovery were led by Dr. Francis Mmiro, from Makerere University Faculty of Medicine, and Dr. Brooks Jackson, from The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. The study was sponsored by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID).

"This extraordinary finding is the most recent in our efforts to bring an end to AIDS, not only in the United States but in countries around the world," says Health and Human Services Secretary Donna E. Shalala. "American scientists along with our international partners are committed to developing treatments that not only work, but that are also feasible in other health care settings. These results achieve both those goals."

According to NIH, results from the study show that a single oral dose of the antiretroviral drug nevirapine (NVP) given to an HIV-infected woman in labor and another to her baby within three days of birth reduces the transmission rate by half compared with a similar short course of AZT. …

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