Magazine article Tikkun

Short Takes: A Look at What's in Other Monthlies and Bimonthlies

Magazine article Tikkun

Short Takes: A Look at What's in Other Monthlies and Bimonthlies

Article excerpt

Short Takes: A Look at What's in Other Monthlies and Bimonthlies

Here TIKKUN continues our conversation with American intellectual, political, and cultural monthly and bimonthly magazines.

Cultural Survival Quarterly

The Spring 2000 issue of Cultural Survival Quarterly focuses on the growing struggle for recognition among the indigenous Hawaiian people. This detailed and multifaceted examination opens with a piece by Haunani-Kay Trask. She notes: "our Native people have suffered all the familiar horrors of contact: massive depopulation, landlessness, christianization, economic and political marginalization ... increasing Diaspora...." A political coalition comprising groups concerned with issues of sovereignty, self-determination, and governmental recognition for Native Hawaiians is gaining strength. While the movement shares some concerns with mainland Native American tribes, it is more strongly allied with other small Pacific island nations that are also working through postcolonial trauma, such as the Solomon Islands, Tahiti, and Samoa. Now, linked by the Internet, political organizations in these geographically isolated nations are joining forces, sharing information and strategies. Although this movement is an important chapter in America's still-unfolding history, you're unlikely to find any mention of it in the mainstream media. That makes this intelligent report even more valuable.

Fast Company

Fat, sleek Fast Company magazine caters to the newest breed of businessperson. The theme of the April 2000 issue is "The Agenda," which the editors define as "grassroots leadership, total teamwork, social justice, and people and technology." It is important to note that "social justice" comes before "people and technology." For example, an article on Pioneer Human Services, a corporate-style nonprofit whose mission is to provide employment training, housing, and counseling services to ex-convicts and former drug abusers, demonstrates that corporate success need not come at the expense of society, nor does helping the marginalized preclude high revenues (Pioneer takes in $52 million a year); rather, the two are seen as complementary. One exec, who left "an impressive job" at Starbucks to join Pioneer, explains, "Taking profits and reinvesting in people has more long-term value than being a company that just takes from society and reaps profits. I'm a capitalist, but I'm a socially responsible capitalist. …

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