Magazine article Tikkun

Short Takes: A Look at What's in Other Magazines and on the Web

Magazine article Tikkun

Short Takes: A Look at What's in Other Magazines and on the Web

Article excerpt

Short Takes: A Look at What's in Other Magazines and on the Web

Here TIKKUN continues our conversation with American intellectual, political, and cultural media.

Columbia Journalism Review

Either dying or dead, serious photo-journalism is suffering an insidious shift in editorial predilection. Commissions of extended photo-essays are fewer. Longtime champions of the art, like Life magazine, have vanished. And rather than dispatch their own photographers, editors now routinely acquire photographic illustration from stockpiles and syndicates. In a personal screed in the July-August Columbia Journalism Review, Russell Miller, a journalist and biographer of the Magnum photo agency, attempts to explain all this in terms of "the burgeoning cult (curse?) of celebrity" and the rise of life-style journalism. Very well, but this does not adequately explain the art's sudden demise. After all, tabloid journalism was refined and perfected some sixty years ago, catering to a public no less infatuated with celebrity affairs then than now. This fault aside, Miller does make a compelling case for the still-frame and its awesome, unequaled power to rivet, transfix, appall, shame, and infuriate.

Newvillage

Is there a viable alternative to globalism? Emphatically yes, says Michael H. Shuman, co-director of the Institute for Policy Studies and director of the Institute for Economic Empowerment and Entrepreneurship in Washington, D.C. His sprawling article in issue two of Newvillage, the journal of Architects/Designers/Planners for Social Responsibility, deconstructs the white-hot notions of free trade and economies of scale that underlie the mega-economy. Communities that export jobs and import goods, and those that rely on distant, monolithic corporations, are vulnerable to market shifts. Small and local is the way to go. The idea is not new; greenmarkets and locally owned shops are traditional neighborhood stabilizers, but Shuman is thinking bigger. Citing a "remarkable right-left consensus" against corporate welfare, and a growing consumer willingness to buy and invest locally even if it costs a little more, he imagines a day when banking behemoths will devolve back to strong local institutions, when farm wastes will be used to make ethanol in nearby refineries (freeing local drivers from petroleum dependency while reducing pollution), and when nearby windmills and solar panels will provide electricity. …

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