Magazine article Washington Report on Middle East Affairs

How Are the Mighty Fallen! U.S. Ambassador to Israel Martin Indyk's Lost (and Found) Security Clearance

Magazine article Washington Report on Middle East Affairs

How Are the Mighty Fallen! U.S. Ambassador to Israel Martin Indyk's Lost (and Found) Security Clearance

Article excerpt

How Are the Mighty Fallen! U.S. Ambassador to Israel Martin Indyk's Lost (and Found) Security Clearance

Andrew I. Killgore, a retired career foreign service officer and former U.S. ambassador to Qatar, is the publisher of the Washington Report.

Martin Indyk, America's ambassador to Israel, is a Zionist. Israeli newspapers reported that Indyk declared himself such when he went to Israel in 1995 as the first American Jewish ambassador to the Jewish state.

Indyk's security clearance was lifted by the State Department in September for "suspected violations" of security standards. Despite its restoration in October, a thousand questions arise--along with a sense of astonished awe that such a high-flying star in the Zionist apparat currently dominating Washington could fall to earth, even temporarily. Moreover, the post-restoration ambassador kept such a low profile at October's Sharm el-Sheikh summit as to be virtually invisible.

Born in London and reared and educated in Australia, Indyk already held high academic and intelligence positions "down under" before moving to Israel. There he is said to have worked for right-wing Likud Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir.

But it was in America's capital that Indyk--former deputy director of research at the American Israel Public Affairs Committee (AIPAC), Israel's Washington, DC lobby, and the first executive director of the AIPAC-spin-off Washington Institute for Near East Policy--leapt to a sudden stardom. In 1993 newly elected President Bill Clinton appointed Indyk chief Middle East adviser on the National Security Council. After having lived in New York and Washington for a decade, Indyk benefitted from a speeded-up process, to acquire U.S. citizenship only 10 days before assuming his new duties.

Following his first ambassadorial assignment to Israel, Indyk returned to Washington in 1995 as head of the Department of State's Bureau of Near Eastern and South Asian Affairs. Then, in 1999, he returned to Israel a second time as U.S. ambassador--reportedly at the request of Israel's new prime minister, Ehud Barak, the successor to Likud Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu, with whom Indyk apparently had little affinity.

During his suspension, Indyk was prohibited from reading classified documents and was permitted to enter the State Department only with an escort to assure he abided by his security restrictions.

No evidence was found of espionage or compromise of classified information, assured the Israel-leaning New York Times and Washington Post. …

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