Magazine article The Spectator

Banned Wagon

Magazine article The Spectator

Banned Wagon

Article excerpt

WHEN Robert Maxwell threw himself from his yacht in 1991, the world finally learnt the extent of his dodgy, business dealings. The libel laws, which he had used to hush criticism as harshly as the Eastern European dictator he resembled, could no longer defend his reputation.

But perhaps not for much longer. Diana Lamplugh, whose estate agent daughter Suzy was murdered in 1986 and who subsequently set up the Suzy Lamplugh Trust, has written to the Home Secretary demanding a change in the law to prevent the living from defiling the memory of the dead. She has been upset by a book written by the journalist Andrew Stephen which claims that her late daughter's lifestyle amounted to a `permanent, lonely quest for sexual fulfilment'. Mr Straw has replied, saying that he will take her case into consideration when he conducts a review of the Victim's Charter.

This is worrying. …

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