Magazine article New Internationalist

The Warrior

Magazine article New Internationalist

The Warrior

Article excerpt

In the Rajasthan desert light, the mounted warriors are magnificent. Their costumes and weapons, their long jet-black locks, even their flesh tones, glow in the pellucid light. Lafcadia, their leader, is skilled, noble, self-possessed - everything his son Katiba wants to be. He's also a stern and careful father who's bringing up Katiba alone. When the warriors ride off, Katiba has to stay.

These opening moments suggest a western - these are the good guys, on a noble quest. The visual style, the focus on the human face, the lack of dialogue, suggests Sergio Leone. However, as we soon realize, this is no spaghetti eastern.

The feudal lord is collecting taxes - the warriors are his enforcers. When an elder claims his village cannot pay, Lafcadia promptly decapitates him. Yet later, when razing the village, his sword drawn to a young girl's throat, he drops his weapon. …

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