Magazine article Multimedia & Internet@Schools

INTERNET@SCHOOLS East: Exploring the Cutting Edge, Shoring Up the Core

Magazine article Multimedia & Internet@Schools

INTERNET@SCHOOLS East: Exploring the Cutting Edge, Shoring Up the Core

Article excerpt

Despite the squeeze on schools and on library media programs, there's still a hunger for information on new ways to tap technology to improve learning ... and the job of the LMS.

I'VE, just returned from Washington, D.C., and our March Internet@ Schools East conference, held each year with the Computers in Libraries conference. I was impressed by the energy and innovation the speakers exhibited. And I was heartened by the number of attendees, as well as by the enthusiasm and interest they showed. Despite the squeeze on schools and on library media programs, there's still a hunger for information on new ways to tap technology to improve learning... and the job of the LMS.

We built the conference program in part around education technology uses that explore the edge: Will Richardson, who wrote our cover story on blogging in MMIS for the January/February 2004 issue, delivered an opening keynote on Weblogs and RSS in a K-12 setting. His talk prompted loads of questions, as well as some near-real-time comments from his students back in New Jersey, which he was able to share with us. MMIS "Pipeline" columnist Stephen Abram examined the concept of multimedia literacy, using as his launch pad this George Lucas question: "If students aren't taught the language of sound and images, shouldn't they be considered as illiterate as if they left college without being able to read or write?"

There were other forward-looking topics, including the safe and sane use of Webcams and the harnessing of new, specialized search tools such as KartOO, Picsearch, and Singing Fish. …

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