Magazine article The Crisis

Will Economic Need Usurp Racial Diversity on Campuses?

Magazine article The Crisis

Will Economic Need Usurp Racial Diversity on Campuses?

Article excerpt

Though the U.S. Supreme Court ruled last June that colleges could use race as one of many factors in admissions decisions, some institutions of higher learning - tearful of legal action by affirmative action foes - have opened programs and scholarships formerly for minorities only to students of all races.

St. Louis University, for example, eliminated its scholarships for African American students and now offers awards that aren't race specific. At Harvard University's business school, a summer program previously reserved for Native Americans, Blacks and Hispanics will include first-generation college students and members of ethnic groups underrepresented in business schools or corporate America. And Yale University now allows White students to participate in Cultural Connections, a popular freshman-orientation program once slated for minorities.

In an email to students, Richard H. Brodhead, dean of Yale's undergraduate college, said that the Supreme Court's rulings in the University of Michigan cases made it "harder to justify programs that separate student communities instead of building them into an interactive whole."

As a result, some schools are focusing on another kind of diversity: economic. For instance, Harvard University president Lawrence H. Summers announced at the 86th annual meeting of the American Council on Education (ACE) in February, that tuition is free for families who earn less than $40,000 a year. The university, which has a $19.3 billion endowment, will also award more financial aid to students from families who earn between $40,000 and $60,000 annually. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.