Magazine article National Defense

Light, Portable Detector to Be Used by All U.S. Military Services

Magazine article National Defense

Light, Portable Detector to Be Used by All U.S. Military Services

Article excerpt

Small, rugged, portable, chemical detectors that can be networked are among the technologies needed today at the Defense Department, officials said during a briefing hosted by the U.S. Army Soldier and Chemical Command (SBCCOM), in Aberdeen, Md.

One program seeking such technologies is the Joint Chemical Agent Detector (JCAD), which is a next-generation, portable detection system for individual use, said Air Force Capt. Patrice Moore, a representative from the Human Systems Programs Office at Brooks Air Force Base, Texas.

!CAD weighs two pounds and occupies 40 cubic inches of space. It is light enough to fit in a pack and can be mounted on vehicles, aircraft or aboard ships. JCAD can be adapted to stand-alone configurations for survey missions, Moore said.

For instance, eye damage can result from lowlevel accumulations of chemical agents that can collect inside of an aircraft-particularly helicopters and transports-over the course of a mission, she explained. For this reason, the ability to detect love levels of chemical agents, 12 hours after the mission has been completed, is a capability that the Air Force wants to have, said Moore.

"JCAD is sufficiently sensitive to warn aircrews before dangerous dose-level accumulations occur," she said. The device also is small and rugged enough to be used by forces on the ground, Moore added.

JCAD will be integrated [networked] with other chemical detection and evaluation platforms, said Moore. "it is important to provide effective detection and warning for long-term, low-dose hazards," she commented. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.