Magazine article The Spectator

Banned Wagon

Magazine article The Spectator

Banned Wagon

Article excerpt

A weekly survey of the things our rulers want to prohibit

FEARS have been expressed that farmers will be forbidden to drive their tractors for more than two hours a day under health-and-safety legislation aimed at cutting their exposure to vibrations. In fact, there is an astonishing amount of legislation preventing willing citizens from engaging in work, of which the European Union's Working Time Directive - limiting employees to a 48-hour week - is only part. Regulations introduced last year limit 15- and 16-year-olds to working just 12 hours a week, on the grounds that longer hours would detract from their schoolwork. Yet, thanks to the government's introduction of university tuition fees, many teenagers now rely on weekend and evening earnings to further their education.

In Glasgow, education authorities have banned schoolchildren from joining milkmen on their rounds before school. Public-sector workers are mostly now forcibly retired before the age of 70, and often before the age at which a state pension becomes payable: tax-worker Bill Killroy-Brown was forcibly retired from the Contributions Agency at 60 out of supposed concern for his health, even though, with a five-year-old daughter to support, he was more worried about his health should he be forced out of work. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.