Magazine article Drug Topics

Letters

Magazine article Drug Topics

Letters

Article excerpt

Importance of communication Congratulations on a well-- written article about Boston pharmacist Christopher Lyman, who had the knowledge, motivation, and opportunity to push for pharmacist involvement in medical rounds because it can reduce the risk of adverse drug events.

Lyman was not the first pharmacist to participate in such action. As you explained in your piece in the Dec. 11 issue, Lyman said that he was actually the third pharmacist sent up to the medical intensive care unit at Massachusetts General Hospital to take part in rounding with physicians in order to reduce ADEs at the time of ordering. But the first two pharmacists didn't work out because one didn't communicate and the other didn't want to communicate.

I remember presenting nine three-hour seminars to pharmacy students from 1974 through 1983 about sexually transmitted diseases, in which I included the subject of communication as a portion of my presentation. Some academics who heard about my presentation even questioned my decision to include anything on the subject. I remember wondering at the time what kind of syllabus, if any, their particular colleges of pharmacy used.

The bottom-line question for pharmacists has usually been, and in some cases continues to be, If you know that something is wrong yet correctable, do you have the motivation, conviction, and patience to communicate the possible solution? …

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